On The Politics of The Individual

It has been the case, more often than not, throughout history that individuals have sought the validation of others. In fact the central facet of an individual’s life may be based on the idea that he or she necessitates the approval, the ever present nod of others in order to persevere in one’s life. The emotional, or rather the sentimental remains the very poison which … Continue reading On The Politics of The Individual

New Libertarian Foundations

The ethos of libertarian thought lies solely, and resolutely in the idea that the freedom of the individual must be an absolute, as long as no harm is brought to others. This is by no means a new concept, but one that has been shared by all great libertarian thinkers, from Friedman to Rand. Yet the decrepit state of current intellectual strains of libertarian-ism has … Continue reading New Libertarian Foundations

Repression in Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade”: The State, The Individual, and The Psyche

Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade” undoubtedly deals with the repression of the individual as a result of the hegemonic culture present in China. This is of no surprise as the totalitarian forces of the Chinese state have made it difficult to distinguish the line between the individual and the masses, in an attempt to normalize deindividuation in an Orwellian fashion. Therefore Zhang Xiaogang’s depiction is not one that simply deals with politics, … Continue reading Repression in Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade”: The State, The Individual, and The Psyche

The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

There have been many Treaties of Paris throughout the modern era. Perhaps the best known of these are the treaties of Versailles (1919) and Saint-Germain (1919), that brought an end to World War I, and which are named after the Parisian suburbs where they were signed. However, the 1763 Treaty of Paris is one of the key documents of eighteenth century history. Indeed, it is … Continue reading The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

Cicero’s Antipathy Towards Clodia Metelli

Clodia Metelli, vindictively referred to as the “Medea of the Palatine” by Cicero, like most Roman matronas was a woman in a man’s world. The prevalent consensus in modern historiography has her placed as a subject not only presented through men’s writing, but also through their tendentious intents. Thus, the question is how do the few sources that exist actually depict Clodia as a Roman woman, and what is their credibility? … Continue reading Cicero’s Antipathy Towards Clodia Metelli

Was E. Herbert Norman Really a Spy?

On April 4th, 1957, E. H Norman, Canadian ambassador to Egypt, shocked the world by leaping off the Swedish embassy in Cairo. After 18 years of serving in Canada’s interests overseas, in the Department of External Affairs, his death horrified Canadians with the realization that they were not insusceptible to the socio-political tensions of the Cold War. Canadian media outlets blamed the U.S. and claimed … Continue reading Was E. Herbert Norman Really a Spy?

The Viability of Gilman’s Women and Economics

Charlotte Perkins Gilman shocked the world with her progressive ideas. Although she did not particularly like the term “feminist”, she is considered one of the most important women to have influenced feminist thought. Her work laid the foundations for generations of women in the First Wave, and gave hope for those who were stuck in perpetuated economic dependency. In 1898, she published the polemical piece … Continue reading The Viability of Gilman’s Women and Economics

The Romanization of Dacia: A Study Through Secondary Sources

By 106 A.D, the Roman empire under Trajan took a step closer to its full territorial extent by annexing the kingdom of Dacia. After the defeat of Decebalus, the last Dacian king, the Dacian wars were proudly exhibited on Trajan’s column, in Rome, which perpetuated the idea of “pax Romana” and the might of the Roman empire. However, Rome did not only seek glory in … Continue reading The Romanization of Dacia: A Study Through Secondary Sources

Lenin’s Failed Revolution

Many contemporary historians argue that history will always favor the October Revolution, of 1917, as a socialist victory. To deny this overstatement is not historical revisionism. Rather, it is a broader understanding of Marxian principles of and the application of Communist theoretical dialectics. Lenin’s Revolution was an obvious deviation from the standard Marxian “laws of development”, and even the idea of “the dictatorship of the … Continue reading Lenin’s Failed Revolution