Waterloo and the Advent of Pax Britannica

On the morning of 18 June 1815, few could have guessed that a sleepy village twenty kilometers south of Brussels would be thrust to prominence. The Battle of Waterloo, an epic clashing of arms, saw Napoleonic France face a coalition of Belgian, British, Dutch and German, Dutch troops under the command of the Duke of Wellington. Late on the morning of 18 June, a sizable … Continue reading Waterloo and the Advent of Pax Britannica

Greek referendum live blog-as it happened-Closed

Greece votes NO as 92% of the votes have been counted. Closing remarks: Greece’s future now remains most uncertain at this might mean that it will leave the Eurozone, although a majority of the population does not wish to. PM Tsipras will have a mandate to take to Brussels and have a hand to see where negotiations will take his country. The current situation on … Continue reading Greek referendum live blog-as it happened-Closed

Repression in Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade”: The State, The Individual, and The Psyche

Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade” undoubtedly deals with the repression of the individual as a result of the hegemonic culture present in China. This is of no surprise as the totalitarian forces of the Chinese state have made it difficult to distinguish the line between the individual and the masses, in an attempt to normalize deindividuation in an Orwellian fashion. Therefore Zhang Xiaogang’s depiction is not one that simply deals with politics, … Continue reading Repression in Zhang Xiaogang’s “Comrade”: The State, The Individual, and The Psyche

Thousands march in Moscow to mourn Nemtsov

More then 20,000 people took to the streets of Moscow on Sunday to protest the death of Boris Nemtsov, an outspoken critique of Putin and the war in Ukraine last week. The persuasive feeling is that the Nemtsov’s death was a political murder at the hands of Putin and his ruling party, although Putin had called the killing ‘vile’ and something aimed at hurting the … Continue reading Thousands march in Moscow to mourn Nemtsov

Fitzgerald: How Tender Is The Night?

When it comes to Fitzgerald, very few of us cannot fall in love with his masterful command of the English language but also the manner in which he presents bourgeois, care-free people doing nothing with their lives but engaging in meaningless socializing with  their peers. Still, what a thrill! The charm and delicacy of Fitzgerald’s “Tender is The Night”, which perhaps is his best novel … Continue reading Fitzgerald: How Tender Is The Night?

The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

There have been many Treaties of Paris throughout the modern era. Perhaps the best known of these are the treaties of Versailles (1919) and Saint-Germain (1919), that brought an end to World War I, and which are named after the Parisian suburbs where they were signed. However, the 1763 Treaty of Paris is one of the key documents of eighteenth century history. Indeed, it is … Continue reading The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

The day I remembered I am free to feel whatever I like

If one day you discover joy Hidden in tubes and splashes of colour Don’t try to become the master of joy. Learning the technique of joy Is like putting structure into your emotions Like drawing lines between this and that Between how it is and how it should be When emotions are supposed to mingle. When you choose a colour You’re not hidding the opposite … Continue reading The day I remembered I am free to feel whatever I like

PIGAPICHA- Nairobi photography exhibition at the UBC MOA

Vancouver, B.C.- An exhibition named PIGAPICHA is currently still on at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver, and it is an illustrious historical journey-through photos- of Kenyan pop-culture in the last 100 years. A collection of around 180 photographs that were taken either on the streets of Nairobi, or carefully staged in studies shows the developing nature of popular culture since 1910. “MOA has always … Continue reading PIGAPICHA- Nairobi photography exhibition at the UBC MOA

200-year old Buddhist mummified monk found in Lotus position

A Mongolian newspaper has reported that a 200 year old monk that still remains in a Lotus meditating position was found intact in the Songinokhairkhan province of Mongolia. Discovery News has said that the mummified monk who was found by accident was covered in animal skin, cow hides more exactly which most likely played a role in its preservation. Another source says: ‘Experts that only had time to carry basic … Continue reading 200-year old Buddhist mummified monk found in Lotus position

The Ethics of Egoism: Why “The Fountainhead” Is Still Important

Few people truly understand Ayn Rand’s philosophical stance. In other words the idea that rational selfishness is the only natural way for a human being to live his or her life, not because they read a paragraph or even a few words out of the thousands she has written on the subject and misconstrue that what she preaches is evil, rather because it is too … Continue reading The Ethics of Egoism: Why “The Fountainhead” Is Still Important