magazines

A Note From The Editor in Chief: Second Issue

On to the second issue of The Art of Polemics. There is something truly amazing in having the ability to read freely in order to become educated on the subjects we love. Here, what we hold closest to our hearts is history, art, and culture. Yet, despite these categories we never forget about opinion and perhaps more importantly, the ability to engage in polemics and … Continue reading A Note From The Editor in Chief: Second Issue

25 November 1950,

David Ben Gurion in Canada

David Ben Gurion and Canada are two words that perhaps do not seem as fitting as one would like, yet it was in the Great North at the age of 32, wishing to serve the Jewish people around the world, that he enlisted in the Jewish Legion of the British Army. Very few people know that he first trained in Nova Scotia, an unlikely place … Continue reading David Ben Gurion in Canada

Statue

History Promotes Humanism

It is no secret that the study of history is in fact the study of people and their stories. It is precisely for this reason why to promote its study, whether independent or through institutions is of great importance to the further evolution of humanism, which in turn would play a substantial role in the evolution in the study of morality and ethics.The question, of … Continue reading History Promotes Humanism

Anne of Britanny

The Funeral of Anne of Brittany

by: Susan Abernethy Anne, Duchess of Brittany had been crowned twice as the Queen of France. She married King Charles VIII and when he died, she married King Louis XII. She suffered through a long and complicated pregnancy history with only two daughters surviving. One of her daughters, Claude, would also be Queen of France. When Anne was thirty-six, she began to suffer from kidney disease. … Continue reading The Funeral of Anne of Brittany

history

10 Things A History Student Will Never Say

10. I Love Writing the Bibliography Section of My Essays. You have to face it. No one likes writing those long and winded lists of authors, book titles, articles and sources. Sure, it is absolutely an integral part of the process of writing history, perhaps more so than we would like to admit, but the truth is that it is very laborious, and time consuming. … Continue reading 10 Things A History Student Will Never Say

Reading

Why Reading and History Go Hand In Hand

 If you ask any history student, or truly anyone that fancies reading history they would probably tell you that both pretty much go hand in hand. Whether this might not resonate with you, the truth is that maybe you haven’t quite gotten a grasp over the way you learn history. The truth is, ultimately, that to become educated in any subject for that matter requires … Continue reading Why Reading and History Go Hand In Hand

Courtesy of the Hanneman Archive

Individual Narratives: Rare 1911 Manual Shows Teacher’s Look At Life At Vesper Graded School

 In a state where the one-room schoolhouse was quite the norm in the early 1900s, tiny Vesper, Wis., boasted an impressive two-story brick school building that was the center of learning for area children for decades. Built in 1906 just off of Main Street in Vesper, the Vesper Graded School was home to students of District No. 1, Town of Hansen. We get an interesting look at life inside the school from ateacher’s … Continue reading Individual Narratives: Rare 1911 Manual Shows Teacher’s Look At Life At Vesper Graded School

Marc Chagall

The Construction of Reality Through Thoughts: Marc Chagall’s I and the Village

Marc Chagall’s I And The Village has been described as a “dreamy” landscape whose very ludicrous nature cannot even be categorized as solely Cubist, Fauvist or Impressionist, but rather as all three movements. In fact, I and the Village as an art piece is many things, and to find one concrete definition is close to impossible. However, there is no doubt that Chagall is denoting … Continue reading The Construction of Reality Through Thoughts: Marc Chagall’s I and the Village