Fitzgerald: How Tender Is The Night?

When it comes to Fitzgerald, very few of us cannot fall in love with his masterful command of the English language but also the manner in which he presents bourgeois, care-free people doing nothing with their lives but engaging in meaningless socializing with  their peers. Still, what a thrill! The charm and delicacy of Fitzgerald’s “Tender is The Night”, which perhaps is his best novel … Continue reading Fitzgerald: How Tender Is The Night?

The Ethics of Egoism: Why “The Fountainhead” Is Still Important

Few people truly understand Ayn Rand’s philosophical stance. In other words the idea that rational selfishness is the only natural way for a human being to live his or her life, not because they read a paragraph or even a few words out of the thousands she has written on the subject and misconstrue that what she preaches is evil, rather because it is too … Continue reading The Ethics of Egoism: Why “The Fountainhead” Is Still Important

One People, Multiple Nations

There are few historians who have ever given Churchill the honour he respects through the means by which they look at history and analyze it. Rightly so as the history of the English Speaking Peoples, one of the richest and most versatile in that of humanity has proven immensely difficult to describe, even more so to explain. It is well known that Churchill did a … Continue reading One People, Multiple Nations

Women in the Viking Age by Judith Jesch

by Susan Abernethy In a continuation of my personal study of the history of the Vikings, I picked up “Women in the Viking Age” by Judith Jesch. Dr. Jesch is Reader in Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham, England and the author of numerous studies of the Viking Age and Old Norse literature. This book is a very thorough examination of the role of women … Continue reading Women in the Viking Age by Judith Jesch

General James Longstreet: The Confederacy’s Most Modern General by Lieutenant Colonel Harold M. Knudsen

 I‘m a novice when it comes to Civil War history. I get lost in the details of the major military campaigns of the war, much less the smaller skirmishes, and even the geography at times. My interest in the Confederacy relates to my ancestry and my interest in Confederate currency. I had three great grandfathers and three great uncles who served in the war. During … Continue reading General James Longstreet: The Confederacy’s Most Modern General by Lieutenant Colonel Harold M. Knudsen

What We Believe But Cannot Prove

  What We Believe But Cannot Prove: Today’s Leading Thinkers on Science in the Age of Certainty We rarely do book reviews, but we found it compelling to do one for the book up top. It is not exactly a book. It is more like a collection of 100+ paragraphs to small essays on what leading intellectual figures in many fields believe is true but … Continue reading What We Believe But Cannot Prove

Robert Darnton’s “The Great Cat Massacre”

Darnton’s book deals with Enlightenment France and the particular process of historiography, in his search to find out the way the French lived in the 18th century.He takes particular instances and primary documents in French history and uses them duly to place them in the broader themes of how the French lived their lives. In one chapter he simply concentrates on the evolution of tell-tales and fantasy among the peasantry of France  from the origins … Continue reading Robert Darnton’s “The Great Cat Massacre”

Arthur Koestler’s Darkness At Noon

  Arthur Koestler was a stark Marxist-Leninist until he became disillusioned with the Soviet Union, when Stalin conducted his show trials that killed thousands in the late 30s. Darkness At Noon, in essence, is the story of an old-guard revolutionary that is found guilty of some ludicrous political crime that he did not commit, and then he gets jailed. Interestingly, the book does not mention the Soviet Union nor the Communist doctrine but puts us … Continue reading Arthur Koestler’s Darkness At Noon

Max Wilhelm Meyer’s The Making Of The World

The Making of The World is a concise book about astronomy and even the philosophy behind the making of the world. Being published in 1906, it is interesting to see how German astronomers saw the world around them as the product of the astronomical process. Wait, what does this have to do with history? Seems like science, doesn’t it? Well don’t worry we will not be doing any math today. The … Continue reading Max Wilhelm Meyer’s The Making Of The World

Sebastian Konrad’s German Colonialism: A Short History

I have recently read this short book for a Nineteenth Century German history class and I was amazed at how concise yet how much information and analysis was packed into it. Konrad is straight to the point. He does not dwell on abstractions, and he certainly does not waste time. German Colonialism: A short history introduces the contentious German colonial empire, and the extent of its rule … Continue reading Sebastian Konrad’s German Colonialism: A Short History