Emanuel Leutze. Washington Crossing the Delaware. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Difficulties of Writing American History

It was a rash decision on my part to go ahead and write on American history. In fact, it was perhaps one of the most difficult things that I had ever done in my entire life. It is more often than not that people lack the understanding of what actually goes into writing a history book, let alone one about the vicissitudes and complexities of … Continue reading The Difficulties of Writing American History

George III

The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

There have been many Treaties of Paris throughout the modern era. Perhaps the best known of these are the treaties of Versailles (1919) and Saint-Germain (1919), that brought an end to World War I, and which are named after the Parisian suburbs where they were signed. However, the 1763 Treaty of Paris is one of the key documents of eighteenth century history. Indeed, it is … Continue reading The Peace that Changed North America: The 1763 Treaty of Paris

Courtesy of the Hanneman Archive

Individual Narratives: Rare 1911 Manual Shows Teacher’s Look At Life At Vesper Graded School

 In a state where the one-room schoolhouse was quite the norm in the early 1900s, tiny Vesper, Wis., boasted an impressive two-story brick school building that was the center of learning for area children for decades. Built in 1906 just off of Main Street in Vesper, the Vesper Graded School was home to students of District No. 1, Town of Hansen. We get an interesting look at life inside the school from ateacher’s … Continue reading Individual Narratives: Rare 1911 Manual Shows Teacher’s Look At Life At Vesper Graded School

Public Domain Images

Cultural Disparity Between the Indigenous Peoples and Colonials of America

The contrasting worldviews of the Indigenous and Colonial people served as a crucial source of social erosion, partly due to misconceptions that arose out of each other’s cultural structures and elements. Thus, it is partly for this reason why European settlers never viewed their Indigenous counterparts as equals, but rather as their inferiors. The extensive cultural differences between Colonial and Indigenous Americans played a significant … Continue reading Cultural Disparity Between the Indigenous Peoples and Colonials of America

Buckley

A Revival in Conservative Intellectualism

There needs to be, without a doubt, a significant rejuvenation of the intellectual basis behind the Conservative movement in America. This, of course, means that a much needed fostering of ideals similar to those advocated by famous Conservatives such as William F. Buckley and Leo Strauss need to put into play in order to create a new means by which Conservative rhetoric can begin to … Continue reading A Revival in Conservative Intellectualism

Manhattan

Manhattan Lives: Lower Class Women and Indentured Servants

Horsmanden wrote “a check has been put to the execrable malice, and bloody purposes of our foreign and domestic enemies” to conclude his controversial Journal. This statement, rather represented the structure of societal hierarchy that needed to be guarded from “domestic enemies”, more specifically, ‘class’ enemies. This is the quintessential factor that makes up Horsamnden’s descriptions of the main participants of the 1741 New York … Continue reading Manhattan Lives: Lower Class Women and Indentured Servants

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Indigenous Views: Women in Early Colonial America

The famous American historian Alan Taylor infers that “the essential role of women in building colonial societies” has recently been illuminated due to the development of complex historiography. Although this might be true, there seems to be a lack of emphasis, especially in academia, on how Indigenous women perceived the general position of all women in colonial society. In other words, few historians have devoted … Continue reading Indigenous Views: Women in Early Colonial America

Thomas Jefferson

Declaration of Independence: Jefferson’s “Facts” for a “Candid World”

It is, undoubtedly, most appropriate to describe the Declaration of Independence as the greatest polemic document in American history. The precise wording, whose meticulous and strategic composition by Jefferson, Franklin, and Adams, holds in itself the key to understanding not only the political and cultural inclinations of the Americans, but also the manner in which British despotism led them to the very document in question. … Continue reading Declaration of Independence: Jefferson’s “Facts” for a “Candid World”

123abigal

The Strength of Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams was the famous wife of John Adams, the second president of the United States. A Federalist, and one of the founding fathers of the country. He was also on the committee who was responsible for the drafting of the Declaration of Independence, along with Jefferson, Franklin, Sherman and Livingston. Adams has been remembered by history as a strong, hard-headed president who firmly believed … Continue reading The Strength of Abigail Adams

Emma_Goldman

Pay For Housework?-Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman was an anarcho-communist feminist. Although she moved away from first-wave feminism she, in essence, still played an important role in the expanding rhetoric of feminism and more importantly, communism, atheism and the general idea of freedom in the late 19th to early 20th century. She was a well-rounded and tough Russian woman who basically shaped the way people thought about the hegemony they lived in. … Continue reading Pay For Housework?-Emma Goldman